RFK Jr. staje się pełnym apologetą Konfederacji

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RFK Jr. staje się pełnym apologetą Konfederacji
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I want to talk about this number 15 this is RFK Jr you know someone had asked me like you know what yesterday like what where what are the differences in how his politics have changed here he is with Tim P at the uh libertarian National Convention uh where RFK is there and one of the things that I enjoyed most about you know sort of like working with and again it I I didn’t wasn’t in the same physical space 90 you know 98% of the time when we did the show I would I would run into to to Bobby and I would see him occasionally but it was mostly um we would do the radio program and we would talk either before or after we recorded a segment and um he had a really interesting historical perspective on things I mean he had been you know he toured the appalachin with his father and his father was very adamant about taking him around to different places and uh it was you know fascinating both as a um a history lesson of US history and an insight into like one of the most famous and prominent uh you know uh political families and also as someone coming from Massachusetts you know you’re you’re steep in that lore um I find some of this a little bit dis disappointing father always believed that our country would never live up to its ideals if we didn’t um make some kind of amends meaningful amends to the um you know to the to the group that was exterminated in order for us to settle in this country and I I think it’s a a good aspiration for every American I don’t think it should be a left-wing or rightwing I I agree with you about the statutes I I don’t think I don’t think it’s a good healthy thing or any culture to erase its history would you condemn Charlottesville melting down the Robert E least statue they gave it to the museum and then horing photos I have a a viseral um reaction against uh against the attacks in those statues I mean I grew up you know in Virginia I know that you know that um that uh there were there were heroes in the Confederacy who didn’t have slaves and you know I just I just have a visual reaction is destroying history I don’t like it I think we should celebrate who we are and that um you know we should celebrate the good qualities of everybody if we want if we want to find people who are completely virtuous on every issue throughout history we would erase all of history and you know values change throughout history and we need to be able to be sophisticated enough to live with you know our ancestors who didn’t agree with us on everything and who did things that are now you know regarded as immoral or um uh you or wrong because they you know maybe they had other qualities that we want to C pause okay okay hold on this is what is so um off base on this and I I find it even hard to believe that he believes this and I should correct myself it’s Tim P’s um you know uh coost co-host uh Hannah Clair brimo I guess that was interviewing him um those statues a were not history uh I mean they’re history in the sense that like I could put anything up uh yesterday and it would be history today right but it was not an accurate retelling of History first off the vast majority of those statues the overwhelming majority of those statues were put up 60 years after the Civil War 60 years after specifically and not uh uh uh coincidentally at the peak membership of the KKK in this country where you had over six million members of the KKK out of a country of a 100 million people where Madison Square Garden was filled with KKK members having a rally and those statutes were put up at a time where there was the peak of the push back the post reconstruction uh push back now I I find it impossible that Bobby doesn’t know this and the fact is that it is very quite possibly that some of those statues of some of those Confederate soldiers or general or whatever leaders some of those people didn’t own slaves and some of them had good qualities but the reason why those statues existed and the whole point of statues remind you is to venerate people and to venerate ideas it’s not a museum the the well the the reason why those statues existed the reason why those statues were made of those people were not because this person had no slaves or this person had had you know good qualities because they were members of the Confederacy and both contemporaneously and in 1920 when a lot of these statues went up or in the teens or whatever it was they were being put up and they were being venerated because they wanted to maintain a system of slavery they were fighting for or slavery whether they had slaves themselves whether they were great people whether they were very generous the reason why they were codified the reason why they were venerated the reason why they were turned into a symbol was to remind people of white supremacy period end of story and to rec and I would like to know his question about the the Confederate flag yeah does he have the same lamentation that we no longer fly the the the Confederate flag over the capital of south Carolina over the capital of uh Mississippi or Alabama wherever it is I mean and he knows this he knows this because the Nuance take is tear down the statue build a museum so that people can learn yeah okay these guys were leaders in the Rebellion to fight on behalf of the institution of slavery and I am all for that we should be learning that in fact if that’s the case too he should be complaining about Ron de santis trying to pull all this history out of books this is what is so disappointing about this and did I hear the beginning of that conversation right yeah were they talking about the Native American people I don’t know what the hell that how that I think he I’m not sure we didn’t we didn’t hear the question before well I mean that that’s I think clearly like when he said the people that were exterminated in this country I for my dad we should do something about that and that is what not and confronting the legacy of Jim Crow well I will say that that would be in keeping with you know some of his activism at Standing Rock right uh when he was doing showing up there and and and at least supporting the water protectors there but like the so he’s not going to challenge at all that co-host conflation of our genocide of the Native American population in this country with the removal of Confederate statues that were put up decades after the end of the Civil War to maintain public support for the for for white supremacy um that is not the same thing as a genocide of the Native American what the question was he could be he could have been referencing something that we didn’t hear but but the nevertheless the the the point is is that he is he must know of the Dunning school he must know of the lost cause he must understand that history gets uh can get revised because certainly he knows that contemporaneously the is an attempt to write that first chapter of history and sometimes that creates a a trajectory of what we understand I mean for how many decades of this country did we not recognize what he just stated at the beginning of that which was that we killed the indigenous people and we owe them something that is a new idea what he when he even articulating that even the fact that his father articulated was a destruction of his history was a destruction of of what we believed up to a certain point and you know the the uh uh like uh if he understands that concept then he must be able to apply it to the notion of yes it’s not it’s a this history was manufactured that these people should be venerated the mere existence of a building if if what he’s saying about these statues was not the then you’d never want to tear down a building either ever regardless of where it is or what what it’s doing at any point yeah wonder if Israel’s destroyed any historical landmarks in the past eight months if we just if we just care about history being preserved so much and Heritage side’s not being destroyed or if that’s maybe a insincere uh principle that we’re just leaning on for a media appearance and he’s just the the answer is stemming from him being asked apparently in a rally he called columb day indigenous people’s day and that’s what that’s I said that good thing about Native like I thought like he pivoted from I said that good thing did do that completely uninformed I mean we should listen to the whole yeah but we don’t know if the question referenced uh you know uh statues I mean who knows what the question was I’m just saying I don’t want to assume that he made that pivot without being unless we’re going to watch she made the pivot for him by asking the question but like if you’re living in the rational world world and you’re making a coherent point about like how we should be respecting indigenous people in this country or at the very least gesturing towards it Confederates are kind of like indigenous people if you think about it you can you should reject the notion that is being described here yeah I guess I mean I think the bottom line is just like he knows better about that that history what it was born from and it was not a question of like you know eliminating all historical facts and it’s not a question of like some type of like woke uh purity test it is about do we want statues venerating um the institution of slavery that doesn’t mean that you eliminate the existence of these Confederate um uh leaders no you should talk about them and you can even say some good things about them in the museum that you want to build but the museum provides the context it’s not just a symbol of a you know sort of venerated uh figure that’s the whole point of statues statues are always propaganda and the question is like you know what I I I’ve told the story many times before but the uh when I was in Cuba in 200 two there is a statue of um of Marti um about I don’t know maybe 600 yards away from the US um consulate or Annex or whatever they call call it they we don’t have an embassy there but it was an Annex okay and Marti is holding his hand out now uh Marti was um the basically the Cuban uh George Washington uh venerated uh uh leader of of Cuba who you know um uh fought against sort of like uh the Western imperialism there and this and that and he’s got he’s holding his hand out like this basically saying stop uh at at the US Consulate and it it’s a statue that is um you know uh completely weathered uh green you know copper and uh its base is cement and and half of it’s weathered away all you see is the you know the big rocks and it it looks like there and Mart is a figure from uh late 1800s I think mid to late 1800s and it looks like that statue’s been there forever and he’s got a child in his hand and he’s like holding and and you wondered is the child representing like Cuba’s national identity or whatever it is and it turns out that that child was ellon Gonzalez [Music] who I don’t know if uh people remember the story of ellien Gonzalez but he came to this country with his father or mother I can’t remember which one in a boat and I think the father drowned um and uh Elon was was was kept with his uh his family and Cuba wanted him back and there was a huge fight and this happened in the mid 90s and you realize that statue has only been there for four or five years but they designed it to look like it had existed for a hundred years and uh Marti a figure from the late 1800s brought together with a figure from The Late n late uh 1900s and it’s it’s propaganda yeah it is creating a history and now you could agree with it you could disagree with it but the point is that’s what statues do and the Nuance take is we got to take that down and we can put all these in a museum I had no problem you don’t have to even destroy these museums you put them into a museum and you could say this was an attempt to rewrite history in this country to venerate people who were supporting slavery in the promotion of what was known as The Lost Cause myth part of a a a uh that that was part of a a school of history that was trying to basically say black people could not run things in reconstruction they had no ability to be uh politicians or to hold wealth and that is why whites had to reassert their political and economic uh power over them that’s what that was it wasn’t about Nathaniel Bedford Forest being good on Horseback and Gallant it was about the re-imposition of white supremacy yeah and a destruction of like the Confederacy or white supremacy let’s just be clear like this is this is not the same as the destruction of a race of human beings he’s pandering um that’s the that that’s what it comes down to he’s he realizes that he said you know on one hand like uh how do I cover for the IND indigenous population I one for me one for you yeah that’s what he’s doing there it’s really sad it really is sad um and people are reminding me that it was Gonzalez’s mother uh who died and his father wanted him back in Cuba and the Miami Cubans were holding him and so uh they had like I think it was Janet Reno had to go down there with armed like people basically and take the child to send back to Cuba uh but nevertheless that’s secondary to the work that the statues do exactly hey folks don’t forget to hit the Subscribe button and check out our daily show we do it every day at 12:00 p.m. Eastern for about 2 and 1/2 hours we even take phone calls you should check that out

żródło

#RFK #staje #się #pełnym #apologetą #Konfederacji
I want to talk about this number 15 this is RFK Jr you know someone had asked me like you know what yesterday like what where what are the differences in how his politics have changed here he is with Tim P at the uh libertarian National Convention uh where RFK is there and one of the things that I enjoyed most about you know sort of like working with and again it I I didn’t wasn’t in the same physical space 90 you know 98% of the time when we did the show I would I would run into to to Bobby and I would see him occasionally but it was mostly um we would do the radio program and we would talk either before or after we recorded a segment and um he had a really interesting historical perspective on things I mean he had been you know he toured the appalachin with his father and his father was very adamant about taking him around to different places and uh it was you know fascinating both as a um a history lesson of US history and an insight into like one of the most famous and prominent uh you know uh political families and also as someone coming from Massachusetts you know you’re you’re steep in that lore um I find some of this a little bit dis disappointing father always believed that our country would never live up to its ideals if we didn’t um make some kind of amends meaningful amends to the um you know to the to the group that was exterminated in order for us to settle in this country and I I think it’s a a good aspiration for every American I don’t think it should be a left-wing or rightwing I I agree with you about the statutes I I don’t think I don’t think it’s a good healthy thing or any culture to erase its history would you condemn Charlottesville melting down the Robert E least statue they gave it to the museum and then horing photos I have a a viseral um reaction against uh against the attacks in those statues I mean I grew up you know in Virginia I know that you know that um that uh there were there were heroes in the Confederacy who didn’t have slaves and you know I just I just have a visual reaction is destroying history I don’t like it I think we should celebrate who we are and that um you know we should celebrate the good qualities of everybody if we want if we want to find people who are completely virtuous on every issue throughout history we would erase all of history and you know values change throughout history and we need to be able to be sophisticated enough to live with you know our ancestors who didn’t agree with us on everything and who did things that are now you know regarded as immoral or um uh you or wrong because they you know maybe they had other qualities that we want to C pause okay okay hold on this is what is so um off base on this and I I find it even hard to believe that he believes this and I should correct myself it’s Tim P’s um you know uh coost co-host uh Hannah Clair brimo I guess that was interviewing him um those statues a were not history uh I mean they’re history in the sense that like I could put anything up uh yesterday and it would be history today right but it was not an accurate retelling of History first off the vast majority of those statues the overwhelming majority of those statues were put up 60 years after the Civil War 60 years after specifically and not uh uh uh coincidentally at the peak membership of the KKK in this country where you had over six million members of the KKK out of a country of a 100 million people where Madison Square Garden was filled with KKK members having a rally and those statutes were put up at a time where there was the peak of the push back the post reconstruction uh push back now I I find it impossible that Bobby doesn’t know this and the fact is that it is very quite possibly that some of those statues of some of those Confederate soldiers or general or whatever leaders some of those people didn’t own slaves and some of them had good qualities but the reason why those statues existed and the whole point of statues remind you is to venerate people and to venerate ideas it’s not a museum the the well the the reason why those statues existed the reason why those statues were made of those people were not because this person had no slaves or this person had had you know good qualities because they were members of the Confederacy and both contemporaneously and in 1920 when a lot of these statues went up or in the teens or whatever it was they were being put up and they were being venerated because they wanted to maintain a system of slavery they were fighting for or slavery whether they had slaves themselves whether they were great people whether they were very generous the reason why they were codified the reason why they were venerated the reason why they were turned into a symbol was to remind people of white supremacy period end of story and to rec and I would like to know his question about the the Confederate flag yeah does he have the same lamentation that we no longer fly the the the Confederate flag over the capital of south Carolina over the capital of uh Mississippi or Alabama wherever it is I mean and he knows this he knows this because the Nuance take is tear down the statue build a museum so that people can learn yeah okay these guys were leaders in the Rebellion to fight on behalf of the institution of slavery and I am all for that we should be learning that in fact if that’s the case too he should be complaining about Ron de santis trying to pull all this history out of books this is what is so disappointing about this and did I hear the beginning of that conversation right yeah were they talking about the Native American people I don’t know what the hell that how that I think he I’m not sure we didn’t we didn’t hear the question before well I mean that that’s I think clearly like when he said the people that were exterminated in this country I for my dad we should do something about that and that is what not and confronting the legacy of Jim Crow well I will say that that would be in keeping with you know some of his activism at Standing Rock right uh when he was doing showing up there and and and at least supporting the water protectors there but like the so he’s not going to challenge at all that co-host conflation of our genocide of the Native American population in this country with the removal of Confederate statues that were put up decades after the end of the Civil War to maintain public support for the for for white supremacy um that is not the same thing as a genocide of the Native American what the question was he could be he could have been referencing something that we didn’t hear but but the nevertheless the the the point is is that he is he must know of the Dunning school he must know of the lost cause he must understand that history gets uh can get revised because certainly he knows that contemporaneously the is an attempt to write that first chapter of history and sometimes that creates a a trajectory of what we understand I mean for how many decades of this country did we not recognize what he just stated at the beginning of that which was that we killed the indigenous people and we owe them something that is a new idea what he when he even articulating that even the fact that his father articulated was a destruction of his history was a destruction of of what we believed up to a certain point and you know the the uh uh like uh if he understands that concept then he must be able to apply it to the notion of yes it’s not it’s a this history was manufactured that these people should be venerated the mere existence of a building if if what he’s saying about these statues was not the then you’d never want to tear down a building either ever regardless of where it is or what what it’s doing at any point yeah wonder if Israel’s destroyed any historical landmarks in the past eight months if we just if we just care about history being preserved so much and Heritage side’s not being destroyed or if that’s maybe a insincere uh principle that we’re just leaning on for a media appearance and he’s just the the answer is stemming from him being asked apparently in a rally he called columb day indigenous people’s day and that’s what that’s I said that good thing about Native like I thought like he pivoted from I said that good thing did do that completely uninformed I mean we should listen to the whole yeah but we don’t know if the question referenced uh you know uh statues I mean who knows what the question was I’m just saying I don’t want to assume that he made that pivot without being unless we’re going to watch she made the pivot for him by asking the question but like if you’re living in the rational world world and you’re making a coherent point about like how we should be respecting indigenous people in this country or at the very least gesturing towards it Confederates are kind of like indigenous people if you think about it you can you should reject the notion that is being described here yeah I guess I mean I think the bottom line is just like he knows better about that that history what it was born from and it was not a question of like you know eliminating all historical facts and it’s not a question of like some type of like woke uh purity test it is about do we want statues venerating um the institution of slavery that doesn’t mean that you eliminate the existence of these Confederate um uh leaders no you should talk about them and you can even say some good things about them in the museum that you want to build but the museum provides the context it’s not just a symbol of a you know sort of venerated uh figure that’s the whole point of statues statues are always propaganda and the question is like you know what I I I’ve told the story many times before but the uh when I was in Cuba in 200 two there is a statue of um of Marti um about I don’t know maybe 600 yards away from the US um consulate or Annex or whatever they call call it they we don’t have an embassy there but it was an Annex okay and Marti is holding his hand out now uh Marti was um the basically the Cuban uh George Washington uh venerated uh uh leader of of Cuba who you know um uh fought against sort of like uh the Western imperialism there and this and that and he’s got he’s holding his hand out like this basically saying stop uh at at the US Consulate and it it’s a statue that is um you know uh completely weathered uh green you know copper and uh its base is cement and and half of it’s weathered away all you see is the you know the big rocks and it it looks like there and Mart is a figure from uh late 1800s I think mid to late 1800s and it looks like that statue’s been there forever and he’s got a child in his hand and he’s like holding and and you wondered is the child representing like Cuba’s national identity or whatever it is and it turns out that that child was ellon Gonzalez [Music] who I don’t know if uh people remember the story of ellien Gonzalez but he came to this country with his father or mother I can’t remember which one in a boat and I think the father drowned um and uh Elon was was was kept with his uh his family and Cuba wanted him back and there was a huge fight and this happened in the mid 90s and you realize that statue has only been there for four or five years but they designed it to look like it had existed for a hundred years and uh Marti a figure from the late 1800s brought together with a figure from The Late n late uh 1900s and it’s it’s propaganda yeah it is creating a history and now you could agree with it you could disagree with it but the point is that’s what statues do and the Nuance take is we got to take that down and we can put all these in a museum I had no problem you don’t have to even destroy these museums you put them into a museum and you could say this was an attempt to rewrite history in this country to venerate people who were supporting slavery in the promotion of what was known as The Lost Cause myth part of a a a uh that that was part of a a school of history that was trying to basically say black people could not run things in reconstruction they had no ability to be uh politicians or to hold wealth and that is why whites had to reassert their political and economic uh power over them that’s what that was it wasn’t about Nathaniel Bedford Forest being good on Horseback and Gallant it was about the re-imposition of white supremacy yeah and a destruction of like the Confederacy or white supremacy let’s just be clear like this is this is not the same as the destruction of a race of human beings he’s pandering um that’s the that that’s what it comes down to he’s he realizes that he said you know on one hand like uh how do I cover for the IND indigenous population I one for me one for you yeah that’s what he’s doing there it’s really sad it really is sad um and people are reminding me that it was Gonzalez’s mother uh who died and his father wanted him back in Cuba and the Miami Cubans were holding him and so uh they had like I think it was Janet Reno had to go down there with armed like people basically and take the child to send back to Cuba uh but nevertheless that’s secondary to the work that the statues do exactly hey folks don’t forget to hit the Subscribe button and check out our daily show we do it every day at 12:00 p.m. Eastern for about 2 and 1/2 hours we even take phone calls you should check that out

46 KOMENTARZE

  1. Liar! Statues aren't for "remembering history", they are for honoring something or somebody. You aren't talking about memorials to the enslaved, you are talking about honoring slaver generals. Take those statues down, put them in a museum next to the plaques and information tables explaining the horrors of slavery and the civil war as a reminder of the evil we must never allow to flourish again. That's how you remember history. That's how we display Nazi insignia etc. in Holocaust museums, for instance. You don't hide away the evidence, but you put it in the proper context to demonstrate the monstrosity of it al.

  2. Kudos to RFK Jr. for defending the noble history of the Confederate States of America (1861-65). Ninety-four percent of Confederate soldiers from the ANV, the Army of Tennessee, and Kirby Smith's Army of the Trans-Mississippi were NOT slaveholders. The 1915 Klan (the revived Klan from the Reconstruction era of 1866 headed by former CSA General Nathan Bedford Forrest) revived by "Colonel" William J. Simmons at Stone Mountain GA. had its true power base in the Midwest and West, not the Deep South – although the national headquarters (Imperial Palace) was in Atlanta GA. The Confederate statues date back to the 1871 statue at Liberty Mississippi. Two CSA generals were present at the funeral of 18th President and Union commander U.S. Grant in 1885: Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Simon Bolivar Buckner. Mr. Seder, please stop your bigoted tirade against noble CSA leaders who in antebellum days helped build our republic and were some of the leading heroes of the Mexican War of 1848.

  3. How in the hell does this man think he's going to be president, when he can barely speak for over 5 minutes straight?!?
    Does he realize how much public speaking is involved being the Commander in Chief?!?
    Imagine trying to listen to his State of the Union Address for over 45 minutes!
    I know that he can't help it, I know that it's caused by a medical issue that is passed genetically, and that he certainly didn't do anything to himself to end up THAT way.
    Nor do I think that he deserves it.
    However, I don't understand why, when he realized how this ailment was going to progress & affect him, WHY he didn't think that anything involving public speaking is most likely NOT going to be a good fit for a future career?!?

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