ODRODZENIE Konfederacji? VA NAACP pozywa Radę Szkół w związku z przywróceniem nazw szkół konfederatów

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ODRODZENIE Konfederacji? VA NAACP pozywa Radę Szkół w związku z przywróceniem nazw szkół konfederatów
Jessica Burbank and Amber Duke discuss the lawsuit the Virginia chapter of the NAACP has brought against a school board over school naming. #Confederacy #naacpimageawards

Originally aired June 14, 2024

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[Music] the Virginia chapter of the NAACP along with a group of students are filing a lawsuit against the shann andoa school board after it approved renaming two Public Schools after Confederate military leaders it marks the latest development in an ongoing battle over Mount View High and honeyrun Elementary formerly Stonewall Jackson high and Ashby Lee Elementary for context Jackson and Lee were both Confederate generals during the Civil War the two schools were renamed in 2020 after racial Justice Advocates urged institutions Nationwide to change building names and remove statues that honored Confederates in a statement reacting to the news the president of the Virginia NAACP chapter said quote my belief is the shenendoa County School Board reaffirmed their commitment to white supremacy and when students walk through Halls of the renamed Stonewall Jackson high school and Ashby Lee Elementary School they will do so with inescapable reminders of Confederate legacies that enslaved and discriminated against African descended people this community deserves better the lawsuit alleges the school board violated the first and 14th amendments along with Title 9 and the equal education opportunities act so Amber this has been a big part of the movement in the United States of continued Racial equality we saw people taking down Confederate statues across the South and as someone who grew up in the north and heard a teaching of history there and has now moved to the South I am critical of how that history is taught simply because uh the way that we treat drug crimes in the United States so if someone were to sell marijuana cocaine hard drugs things that are illegal in the US uh they typically get a harsher sentencing and are treated harsher in our justice system than someone buying and using the drugs and that was precisely the economic circumstances of slavery in the United States the north was not the good guys they weren’t you know worse than the South it’s just they were both bad and I think um because this war was one fought in part to free the slaves that’s important but it it was also fought for a lot of people in the South uh over economic reasons that are legitimate and not the typical ones people talk about because the north was dependent on the same slavery The South was the north just wanted very cheap basic raw Goods uh the crops sent directly up to them that were sold for extremely low prices to the north because they depended upon free labor and then the north would finish the goods package them and sell them for much higher and Export them and make a ton of money off of slavery they were also dependent on slavery and so to expect the same prices to be given if slaves were free was a part of the content contention and of course Frederick Douglas had to convince Abraham Lincoln that freeing the slaves should be a part of the war it wasn’t like Lincoln was this really good guy it came out of radical black organizing but I will say that doesn’t mean I think there should be Confederate statues I don’t think British people living in the United States should be like oh this is our Charles Cornwallis Elementary School people will be upset about that not because the history doesn’t exist but because like you guys lost yeah so in this case what happens with these schools is that they apparently went through a process to change the names without input from the community and the reason they changed them back is because they held a vote and I think somewhere between 91 to 93% of the uh taxpaying residents said that they wanted the Confederate names to return so it’s sort of like a democracy and action type of situation but I think even if we just dig into the reasons why these schools were named after these individuals in the first place it’s important to understand the uh sort of contextual history surrounding figures like Stone Jackson Robert elely and Turner Ashby actually none of these individuals were particularly pro-slavery none of them were really fighting for economic reasons on behalf of the South all three of them though were from Virginia some of them affiliated with Virginia Military Institute and really felt very strongly that they were protecting their Homeland and their families um this was a very personal uh War for them Stonewall Jackson actually was very opposed to the war in the first place and only got involved when he was ordered by uh by the Virginia Military to report for Duty he tried to have a National Day of Prayer to uh to encourage the South to oppose getting involved in the war Robert El Lee of course was a very significant figure in the reconciliation of the country after the war um soal Jackson and Turner Ashby both uh died I believe either during the war or shortly after um so they were unable to participate in that way but Robert El Lee was someone who wouldn’t even take a high-profile position after the war because he thought that it was considered so immoral to profit and become sort of a an a famous figure based off of what had happened so he took a position at a small College being the president there and that was sort of what inspired this uh National reconciliation Memorial in Arlington Cemetery that is also slated for removal and so I think it’s important to understand that context because if we’re comparing these three figures to schools that are named after George Washington or Thomas Jefferson there’s really not that much difference in terms of how they viewed slavery and the fact that they all probably own slaves um so we have to be able to reconcile the bad things that people in American history did with the good that they did and it’s not always an easy question of well this person fought for the Confederacy so they’re bad and as you said just because somebody was on the Northern side doesn’t mean that they’re good um founding fathers often own slaves many of them of course own slaves Thomas Jefferson was known for having sexual relations with his slaves so he’s not this perfect person either but I think it’s okay to recognize that someone has a complicated history and that we’re honoring them for their positive contributions and not for their negative contributions and unfortunately this seems to always start with confederate leaders but it never stops there we’ve seen people try to take down statues in Lafayette Square outside of the White House there’s been attempts to take down uh Jefferson monuments to take down Lincoln monuments uh George Washington related monuments these things are constantly vandalized and defaced with graffiti and people hanging off of them during protests around DC so it’s a a slippery slope to me that we start with these individuals because it’s easy to say oh well South bad Civil War bad um but we don’t really look at the full context and that inevitably leads to people going after after statues of the Founding Fathers as well yeah it’s interesting the statistic you bring in of the background of how this came to be of 91% of people in the district uh who are taxpayers in the district supporting the naming of the schools but as someone who’s lived in the South for you know a few years now I’ve seen a lot of towns that are very segregated um and I think there are there are some towns that are just considered white towns some towns that are still considered black towns and colloquially are called that in my high school which is you know in Stanford Connecticut it’s the part of Connecticut that sticks out into New York but it’s still a part of New England we had our high school with two different cafeterias and I went to the trade school so I didn’t eat in the main school’s cafeterias really ever but uh our principal even was caught referring to them as the white and black cafeterias and that is what they were Cally colloquially called and they were self-segregated and so you know the the history of of racism and seg ation and slavery is pretty recent in the United States and so to think of a school district where the public schools are named this it’s almost communicating you know this is a white town and and white people are the ones making the rules about it because I I don’t think black families would feel comfortable moving into this town I think that’s why there should be some kind of ruling nationally about this because of of what it signals to people who should feel comfortable moving to whatever town they get a job in in the United States of America regard less of you know the the naming of the school and if the naming of the school is something that makes a whole community of people feel uncomfortable uh I think that’s something worth looking into under the requirements we have that everyone’s you know treated equally in the United States and so while Thomas Jefferson and George Washington were bad guys I think having a school be named after someone on one side of a war fa within the United States is alienating especially considering the racial backgrounds it’s it’s divisive and so I don’t think any school should be named after a general maybe they should be named after a great teacher from the past maybe not Thomas Jefferson or George Washington at all maybe someone who has you know a cleaner record and was a good person even by you know today’s standards of what makes a great man yeah I guess again we we just got into well we should get rid of the George Washington and Thomas Jefferson names off of schools too and I just I don’t agree with that I think most Americans don’t agree with that and so we get directly into this slippery slope of okay we’re going to take down Confederate leaders and then all of a sudden sudden our founding fathers are the next one on the chopping block and that gets to the point where I think we are erasing American history and being unwilling to Grapple with the fact that it still be taught in the schools Amber they just won’t be named after them but why do you think we shouldn’t name a school after George Washington just because he he owned slaves like every pretty much every wealthy American did at the time should we name any say we shouldn’t I said there’s there’s better names that we could come up with maybe we should if there are better names and that George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are not the same as the Confederate generals because that was a war fought with opposing sides within the country so it’s more divisive than someone who was the president yeah I mean the Confederate generals were talking about also uh had ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War for American independence some of them fought bravely in the Mexican-American war in the War of 1812 um so I again I just don’t think it’s uh it’s useful to distill down their achievements and their legacy Legacy to them being on the wrong side of a war because they happen to be born in Virginia yeah I I just don’t think we need to name a school after them especially when it’s a war fought with opposing sides in this country and we have people moving across the North and the South I think it’s not about not honoring that Legacy of course that history will be taught in the classrooms in the schools it’s really about you know what it signals to everyone what it means to everyone when you name the school in the town after a confederate soldier it really brings us back in history in a way that I don’t think is necessary yeah I I wish it were true that we would continue to teach uh the history but we’ve already seen in the past that when the Robert El Le statue was taken down in Charlottesville it was supposed to be moved to a museum so people could obviously learn about all the complicated history surrounding it instead it was smelted in the middle of the night without any Community input or without even telling people that it was going to happen and so I think really this is just the first step towards erasing history and I don’t buy that we can have it both ways that we can remove any names or statues Etc and we shouldn’t worry because it’ll be taught in the public schools if history is any guide uh actually erasing these statues and names is really just the first step to a larger type of tyranny um I know we’re going to have to leave it there but we’ll be back with more Rising after this [Music]

żródło

#ODRODZENIE #Konfederacji #NAACP #pozywa #Radę #Szkół #związku #przywróceniem #nazw #szkół #konfederatów
[Music] the Virginia chapter of the NAACP along with a group of students are filing a lawsuit against the shann andoa school board after it approved renaming two Public Schools after Confederate military leaders it marks the latest development in an ongoing battle over Mount View High and honeyrun Elementary formerly Stonewall Jackson high and Ashby Lee Elementary for context Jackson and Lee were both Confederate generals during the Civil War the two schools were renamed in 2020 after racial Justice Advocates urged institutions Nationwide to change building names and remove statues that honored Confederates in a statement reacting to the news the president of the Virginia NAACP chapter said quote my belief is the shenendoa County School Board reaffirmed their commitment to white supremacy and when students walk through Halls of the renamed Stonewall Jackson high school and Ashby Lee Elementary School they will do so with inescapable reminders of Confederate legacies that enslaved and discriminated against African descended people this community deserves better the lawsuit alleges the school board violated the first and 14th amendments along with Title 9 and the equal education opportunities act so Amber this has been a big part of the movement in the United States of continued Racial equality we saw people taking down Confederate statues across the South and as someone who grew up in the north and heard a teaching of history there and has now moved to the South I am critical of how that history is taught simply because uh the way that we treat drug crimes in the United States so if someone were to sell marijuana cocaine hard drugs things that are illegal in the US uh they typically get a harsher sentencing and are treated harsher in our justice system than someone buying and using the drugs and that was precisely the economic circumstances of slavery in the United States the north was not the good guys they weren’t you know worse than the South it’s just they were both bad and I think um because this war was one fought in part to free the slaves that’s important but it it was also fought for a lot of people in the South uh over economic reasons that are legitimate and not the typical ones people talk about because the north was dependent on the same slavery The South was the north just wanted very cheap basic raw Goods uh the crops sent directly up to them that were sold for extremely low prices to the north because they depended upon free labor and then the north would finish the goods package them and sell them for much higher and Export them and make a ton of money off of slavery they were also dependent on slavery and so to expect the same prices to be given if slaves were free was a part of the content contention and of course Frederick Douglas had to convince Abraham Lincoln that freeing the slaves should be a part of the war it wasn’t like Lincoln was this really good guy it came out of radical black organizing but I will say that doesn’t mean I think there should be Confederate statues I don’t think British people living in the United States should be like oh this is our Charles Cornwallis Elementary School people will be upset about that not because the history doesn’t exist but because like you guys lost yeah so in this case what happens with these schools is that they apparently went through a process to change the names without input from the community and the reason they changed them back is because they held a vote and I think somewhere between 91 to 93% of the uh taxpaying residents said that they wanted the Confederate names to return so it’s sort of like a democracy and action type of situation but I think even if we just dig into the reasons why these schools were named after these individuals in the first place it’s important to understand the uh sort of contextual history surrounding figures like Stone Jackson Robert elely and Turner Ashby actually none of these individuals were particularly pro-slavery none of them were really fighting for economic reasons on behalf of the South all three of them though were from Virginia some of them affiliated with Virginia Military Institute and really felt very strongly that they were protecting their Homeland and their families um this was a very personal uh War for them Stonewall Jackson actually was very opposed to the war in the first place and only got involved when he was ordered by uh by the Virginia Military to report for Duty he tried to have a National Day of Prayer to uh to encourage the South to oppose getting involved in the war Robert El Lee of course was a very significant figure in the reconciliation of the country after the war um soal Jackson and Turner Ashby both uh died I believe either during the war or shortly after um so they were unable to participate in that way but Robert El Lee was someone who wouldn’t even take a high-profile position after the war because he thought that it was considered so immoral to profit and become sort of a an a famous figure based off of what had happened so he took a position at a small College being the president there and that was sort of what inspired this uh National reconciliation Memorial in Arlington Cemetery that is also slated for removal and so I think it’s important to understand that context because if we’re comparing these three figures to schools that are named after George Washington or Thomas Jefferson there’s really not that much difference in terms of how they viewed slavery and the fact that they all probably own slaves um so we have to be able to reconcile the bad things that people in American history did with the good that they did and it’s not always an easy question of well this person fought for the Confederacy so they’re bad and as you said just because somebody was on the Northern side doesn’t mean that they’re good um founding fathers often own slaves many of them of course own slaves Thomas Jefferson was known for having sexual relations with his slaves so he’s not this perfect person either but I think it’s okay to recognize that someone has a complicated history and that we’re honoring them for their positive contributions and not for their negative contributions and unfortunately this seems to always start with confederate leaders but it never stops there we’ve seen people try to take down statues in Lafayette Square outside of the White House there’s been attempts to take down uh Jefferson monuments to take down Lincoln monuments uh George Washington related monuments these things are constantly vandalized and defaced with graffiti and people hanging off of them during protests around DC so it’s a a slippery slope to me that we start with these individuals because it’s easy to say oh well South bad Civil War bad um but we don’t really look at the full context and that inevitably leads to people going after after statues of the Founding Fathers as well yeah it’s interesting the statistic you bring in of the background of how this came to be of 91% of people in the district uh who are taxpayers in the district supporting the naming of the schools but as someone who’s lived in the South for you know a few years now I’ve seen a lot of towns that are very segregated um and I think there are there are some towns that are just considered white towns some towns that are still considered black towns and colloquially are called that in my high school which is you know in Stanford Connecticut it’s the part of Connecticut that sticks out into New York but it’s still a part of New England we had our high school with two different cafeterias and I went to the trade school so I didn’t eat in the main school’s cafeterias really ever but uh our principal even was caught referring to them as the white and black cafeterias and that is what they were Cally colloquially called and they were self-segregated and so you know the the history of of racism and seg ation and slavery is pretty recent in the United States and so to think of a school district where the public schools are named this it’s almost communicating you know this is a white town and and white people are the ones making the rules about it because I I don’t think black families would feel comfortable moving into this town I think that’s why there should be some kind of ruling nationally about this because of of what it signals to people who should feel comfortable moving to whatever town they get a job in in the United States of America regard less of you know the the naming of the school and if the naming of the school is something that makes a whole community of people feel uncomfortable uh I think that’s something worth looking into under the requirements we have that everyone’s you know treated equally in the United States and so while Thomas Jefferson and George Washington were bad guys I think having a school be named after someone on one side of a war fa within the United States is alienating especially considering the racial backgrounds it’s it’s divisive and so I don’t think any school should be named after a general maybe they should be named after a great teacher from the past maybe not Thomas Jefferson or George Washington at all maybe someone who has you know a cleaner record and was a good person even by you know today’s standards of what makes a great man yeah I guess again we we just got into well we should get rid of the George Washington and Thomas Jefferson names off of schools too and I just I don’t agree with that I think most Americans don’t agree with that and so we get directly into this slippery slope of okay we’re going to take down Confederate leaders and then all of a sudden sudden our founding fathers are the next one on the chopping block and that gets to the point where I think we are erasing American history and being unwilling to Grapple with the fact that it still be taught in the schools Amber they just won’t be named after them but why do you think we shouldn’t name a school after George Washington just because he he owned slaves like every pretty much every wealthy American did at the time should we name any say we shouldn’t I said there’s there’s better names that we could come up with maybe we should if there are better names and that George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are not the same as the Confederate generals because that was a war fought with opposing sides within the country so it’s more divisive than someone who was the president yeah I mean the Confederate generals were talking about also uh had ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War for American independence some of them fought bravely in the Mexican-American war in the War of 1812 um so I again I just don’t think it’s uh it’s useful to distill down their achievements and their legacy Legacy to them being on the wrong side of a war because they happen to be born in Virginia yeah I I just don’t think we need to name a school after them especially when it’s a war fought with opposing sides in this country and we have people moving across the North and the South I think it’s not about not honoring that Legacy of course that history will be taught in the classrooms in the schools it’s really about you know what it signals to everyone what it means to everyone when you name the school in the town after a confederate soldier it really brings us back in history in a way that I don’t think is necessary yeah I I wish it were true that we would continue to teach uh the history but we’ve already seen in the past that when the Robert El Le statue was taken down in Charlottesville it was supposed to be moved to a museum so people could obviously learn about all the complicated history surrounding it instead it was smelted in the middle of the night without any Community input or without even telling people that it was going to happen and so I think really this is just the first step towards erasing history and I don’t buy that we can have it both ways that we can remove any names or statues Etc and we shouldn’t worry because it’ll be taught in the public schools if history is any guide uh actually erasing these statues and names is really just the first step to a larger type of tyranny um I know we’re going to have to leave it there but we’ll be back with more Rising after this [Music]

34 KOMENTARZE

  1. Vast numbers, huge percentages, of students can’t read or "numerate" at grade level. This is like someone bleeding out on the street and you’re concerned about the writing on their shirt.

    They need to focus more on students’ literacy and numeracy skills. Then…critical thinking skills. Basic trivium-type education. WAY down the list of priorities is the debate on what the name of the school should be.

    But let’s not kid ourselves. This is an Idiocracy and the government – which caused it – is the last organization you want to try to fix it.

  2. The war was NOT fought to free slaves.

    It was fought to maintain territory and economic power.

    There is NOTHING wrong with honoring generals that fought for what they viewed as their homeland.

    The hate here is not on the part of the then Democratic party rebellion protecting slavery. It is this new despicable revisionist progressives who can't accept history as it is with its value and its faults.

  3. Jessica, you and many other Leftists cannot to judging leaders of the past with current day Leftists' sensibilities. That is called presentism. At this rate, no one would have a statue may by them because they would not be considered "perfect" in a Leftist's eyes. I mean, the statues that Leftist would want to put now could be torn down 20 or 30 years from now based on a the whims and fickleness of any ever-changing population.

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